How Much Can You Afford to Lose?

I have never been robbed yet . . . . . is it because I’m lucky? . . . . . . perhaps I am more aware? . . . . . perhaps I am more careful?

I don’t really know. . . . . but that doesn’t stop me taking some precautions.

Something I’m Prepared To Lose

When I am overseas I generally have more cash than I have at home.

Cancelling credit cards can be slower and more difficult.

For that reason the wallet I use overseas is one I am prepared to lose.

It contains enough to make it look convincing as my only source of funds:

  • Cash – Only enough to cover my expected spend for the day; say $100 – $150 dollars.
  • Credit Cards – Cancelled or expired ones only.
  • Hotel Key Card – A souvenir from a hotel stay years ago.
  • Frequent Flyer Card – Not valuable

I still take the normal precautions against pickpockets with the wallet in the front pocket of my trousers.

However if my pocket was picked, or even if I was threatened for for my wallet I would be a little disappointed, but it would be an acceptable loss.

Much better than being injured, or killed trying to protect it.

A Stash

In addition to the ‘Wallet’ I do have a ‘Stash’ of another $100-$150 dollars, my genuine credit card, and the real hotel key card.

I keep this in a small zip lock bag which fits in a tiny inconspicuous pocket inside the waistband of my trousers.

Travel Hack

A secondary advantage of keeping only a small amount of cash in your wallet is when you are bargaining.

You can use the line “I’m almost spent up as you can see!”

Travelling With Medications

For many years we didn’t have to bother about travelling with medicines, but as we have got older we both need to take pills daily.

Usually its not a problem travelling domestically, travelling internationally it can be a little more complicated.

Law Enforcement

Laws on drugs vary considerably between countries, particularly if you are taking a narcotic drug.

Although it’s unlikely you’ll be stopped and questioned about your medications, it is a possibility.

You never know if a search dog may pick you out.

Proof that you have been prescribed the medication will make the situation easier.

Evidence

The easiest way of providing evidence that you are entitled to the medicine is the original box, or bottle, with the pharmacists label.

If you are taking very strong drugs it may be useful to also get a letter from your doctor.

Losing Medicines

Minimise the risk of losing medicines by always having them in your carry on and taking a couple of weeks extra in case there is a delay in returning home.

Make sure you have a record of the details (such as a photo of the pharmacy tag) so you can get replacements if your carry-on is stolen.

Medical Emergencies

If you have a medical emergency, having the details of your medicines will help a doctor determine the best treatment for you.