Drying Clothes

I only travel with a few pairs of boxer shorts and socks so washing every couple of days in a necessity.

So how do you get things dry?

Here is what I do.

Step 1

After washing and wringing out the items I lay them out on a bath towel.

Generally I aim to cover about half the towel.

Step 2

Fold the remaining half over the clothes.

Then fold the middle over again.

Step 3

Roll the towel tightly from the edge.

Leave for a couple of minutes.

The clothes won’t be absolutely dry, but no more than a bit damp.

Hang them up overnight and they should be dry by the morning.

Checking Out Checklist

Have you ever left anything in a Hotel Room? . . . . I know I have.

Here is a quick checklist to help stop you losing stuff.

  • Wardrobe hanging space
  • Wardrobe shelves
  • Coat hook behind door
  • Under the bed
  • Room safe
  • Desk drawers
  • Bedside tables top
  • Bedside drawers
  • Bathroom shelves
  • Bathroom drying rail
  • Chargers + cables
  • Travel power adapter

If you can think of anything else . . . leave a comment.

Walking Hazards

I’m currently touring around Europe which has reminded me of a couple of the hazards walking around another country.

Bikes

Bicycles are a much more common form of transport in Europe than most places.

Many places have differentiated areas where the bikes have priority such as this paved area in Hamburg . . . so make sure you don’t wander onto it.

The problem is that the cyclists don’t always stick to their area, especially when they are passing another cyclist.

In Amsterdam where the streets are narrow and the footpaths tiny it can make you very nervous.

Cobbles

Not just in streets but on the footpath.

If you have a spinner suitcase cobbles can be a real issue.

Particularly a pavement with bands of cobbles like this.

As well as the extra wear, and the noise, the case is constantly twisting in your hands.

With my normal carry on I will often walk up to a km from the station to my hotel.

If I’m travelling with a spinner case I will be getting a taxi for anything over a couple of hundred metres.

Making Room For Shopping

My friends know I can’t resist buying loud shirts when I am travelling. . . . . but wonder how I find room in my luggage to bring them back.

Well I work on the principle of throwing things away as I travel.

When I notice a pair of socks gets a small hole in them; like this example they go in my travel box.

They can get the last wear the next time I am away and then its in the bin.

The same applies to worn underpants and stained, or slightly torn T shirts.

On a typical holiday i would probably throw away 4-5 old and worn items of clothes, . . . which means there is room in my bags for a couple of shirts.

Remember The Tissues

When I am travelling overseas I normally have a couple of packets of tissues like these in my pockets.

Or they are in a day pack if I am off for a swim.

If you have been caught short in a squat toilet with no paper you will understand their importance.

Where To Get Them

You will find that you can buy packets fairly easy in most countries.

Often, in Asia, you will find some old poor people going round selling them so why not help them out and buy a couple of packets?

In Hong Kong you will often find you get a packet, with your change, in a convenience store.

How Much Can You Afford to Lose?

I have never been robbed yet . . . . . is it because I’m lucky? . . . . . . perhaps I am more aware? . . . . . perhaps I am more careful?

I don’t really know. . . . . but that doesn’t stop me taking some precautions.

Something I’m Prepared To Lose

When I am overseas I generally have more cash than I have at home.

Cancelling credit cards can be slower and more difficult.

For that reason the wallet I use overseas is one I am prepared to lose.

It contains enough to make it look convincing as my only source of funds:

  • Cash – Only enough to cover my expected spend for the day; say $100 – $150 dollars.
  • Credit Cards – Cancelled or expired ones only.
  • Hotel Key Card – A souvenir from a hotel stay years ago.
  • Frequent Flyer Card – Not valuable

I still take the normal precautions against pickpockets with the wallet in the front pocket of my trousers.

However if my pocket was picked, or even if I was threatened for for my wallet I would be a little disappointed, but it would be an acceptable loss.

Much better than being injured, or killed trying to protect it.

A Stash

In addition to the ‘Wallet’ I do have a ‘Stash’ of another $100-$150 dollars, my genuine credit card, and the real hotel key card.

I keep this in a small zip lock bag which fits in a tiny inconspicuous pocket inside the waistband of my trousers.

Travel Hack

A secondary advantage of keeping only a small amount of cash in your wallet is when you are bargaining.

You can use the line “I’m almost spent up as you can see!”